Islam in Australia

ALA: First impression

Since before its launch in October, I have keenly followed the progression of a new Australian political party; the Australian Liberty Alliance (ALA). Needless to say, I have been impressed by the ALA’s policies and messages, in spite of the tsunami of political and media pressure, to reduce the scope and impact of its populist platform.

Now, fresh from my first meeting with ALA members and leaders, and with patriotic adrenaline flowing through my blood, I feel further positioned to offer a legitimate and candid explanation as to why, this bold, new party, can be centre- stage to upholding Australian values and customs for generations to come.

If not anything else, the meeting emphasized the importance of patriotism, for Western civilization, and for Australia. I share the viewpoint of the ALA, that there should be no need, at any stage, to apologize for Western civilization, or for being white. It should always be recognized, that European, North American, and Australasian countries, have historically formed a superior culture and way of life. Whether this be measured in the separation between church and state, our democratic principles, tolerance and justice, or pivotal Christian values, such as the sanctity of life, our value system requires no lectures or alterations. Regrettably, as particularly stressed during the meeting, Western academia has become dominated by neo- Marxists, feminists, and post- colonial theorists, who avidly aim to denigrate Western culture, and history. Virtually all of our cultural issues, of which Islamization presents one, can be stemmed back to conviction- lacking viewpoints, which has been so effectively perpetuated by tertiary elites. Thus, the ALA vowed that if elected to a position of substantive leverage, universities would refocus tertiary education back to irs original purpose, and re- balance the heavily Left- wing and politically correct orientated positions commonly purported.

In addition to reigniting this fundamental belief amongst the modern inheritors of our great civilization through our Universities, an array of other effective, meaningful policies were also propagated. These included withdrawing Australia from the outdated 1951 Refugee convention, cutting off welfare for families in polygamous marriages, enacting a ten year moratorium on immigration from the OIC (with exceptions for non- Muslim persecuted minorities), encouraging integration over separation, halting the spread of Islamic finance and stripping dual- citizenship for all habitual criminals.

Certainly, there are further ALA solutions to caressing further Islamization, and equally, the party is far from a single issue party.

Regardless, from what I have seen tonight, given the presence of such a diverse field of patriotic individuals, there is cause for genuine optimism. Undoubtedly, there are enough ordinary, decent- minded Australians, to make a quantifiable and worthwhile difference, in guaranteeing that our core values of freedom and democracy, remain fiercely fought for.

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27 thoughts on “ALA: First impression

  1. You are correct, some of the few legal countries include Jordan, Indonesia and Turkey. This aspect of Islamic culture is certainly in need of progression. However, just because it is part of the culture and state does not mean it is necessarily acted upon. It is fair, however, to say that the minority in regards to the practice the death penalty (7 countries) and worth noting that around the world the death penalty has been common for homosexuals.

    Ultimately, we must refocus on the original point in your argument- which was to isolate and separate the two cultures placing western civilisation as superior. Your suggested solution is to stop migration of all Muslim people to Australia, although I am unsure as to how you would deal with our current Muslim population OR how that will improve conditions for the persecute homosexual men overseas.

    These issues certainly need to be raised and advocated as it is unacceptable that homosexual men are persecuted in this fashion, however, stereotyping of all Muslim people with extreme radicals must be avoided.

    1. How am I sterotyping all Muslims? I’m merely saying that in regards for the execution of homosexuals, it is only Muslims on a mass scale that are acting in these vile ways, as well as their terrible treatment of many other groups. This is not sterotyping, these are religious based tyranny that is occurring right now, that id rather not further import here

    2. You are certainly outlining the laws of some countries, however, to suggest that all Muslim people accept and condone these laws is stereotyping. For example in regards to gay marriage in Australia a vast majority of people support the movement and yet the law forbids it.

      On a side note have you considered that perhaps some of the Muslim people you would like to ban from migrating from Australia are moving due to homosexual persecution? If migration was banned then this would certainly result in a poor outcome for these people. Therefore you must certainly want to enable religious freedom; a key policy of the ALA – maintaining the constitution – which includes the right to religious freedom.

    3. Yes we allow religious freedom within our borders. Moreover, I would note, that the ala doesn’t advocate for a ban on Muslims, instead it calls for a moratorium on immigration from the OIC

    4. Actually the ALA does propose a ban on muslim immigration of all resident visa categories from the OIC to Australia with a 10-year moratorium (prohibition or ban). Of course, the ALA generously allow the exception of persecuted non-islamic minorities from OIC countries.

      Australian Liberty Alliance will seek to enact the policy proposals outlined in the paper “Practical Steps to Stop Islamisation”, first published by Q Society of Australia Inc in February 2014.

      These proposals include a 10-year moratorium on all resident visa categories for applicants from member countries of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC). Exceptions shall apply to the humanitarian intake of persecuted non-Islamic minorities from OIC countries.

      http://australianlibertyalliance.org.au/values-and-policies/values-and-core-policies

      I’m not advocating for an open-borders policy, I do, however, believe that individuals should be judged on their merits rather than their religion which of course forms a component but does not dictate the whole.

    5. Well Muslims can come here, just from countries outside the OIC. Well, its really a matter of a cost benefit analysis. The costs of Islamic immigration, are from more immense than its benefits, and it would take the argument of the century to convince me otherwise.

    6. I’m glad to hear that you appreciate that and in fact the UN and Australian government does some very good work with refugees, asylum seekers and migrants.

      Fortunately I’ve done a rapid cost-benefit analysis; if for instance a homosexual man remains in an Islamic country he is likely to be persecuted and at worse killed. Thus the cost for him is his life. In addition there is a cost of money- to migrate to Australia he will have to pay between $7-12,000 AUD to become a resident. Now if this man was a refugee the Australian government would pay roughly $12,000/year once he had been processed and was in the community. It is hard to quantify the economic gain from refugees, however, migrants are responsible for a strong positive contribution to the Australian economy.

      http://www.australia-migration.com/page/Migration_Costs/92
      http://www.refugeeaction.org.au/?page_id=3447

      Cost-benefits aside, there is also that thing about saving someones life. You have to ask yourself if you were a persecuted individual would you want the opportunity to leave to a better country and for the people in that country to accept you?

    7. On an Australian cost benefit analysis, after 6 months. Only 7 % of refugees reported working as their primary incomes. Check my post on peter dutton from around a week ago.
      And yes we have helped out Islamic refugees enough for my liking. Starting from the early 80s from Lebanon, and look at the issues now in integration, polygamy, fgm, and terror threats. It is through the roof. What did the 3 perpetrators of our 3 Islamic terror attacks have in common? They were all refugees. Now not for a second am I claiming all or even most refugees have evil intentions, but the majority of refugees are Islamic, and with that comes a particular set of costs that personally I am unwilling to take on.

    8. I’m glad to hear that you appreciate that and in fact the UN and Australian government does some very good work with refugees, asylum seekers and migrants.

      Fortunately I’ve done a rapid cost-benefit analysis; if for instance a homosexual man remains in an Islamic country he is likely to be persecuted and at worse killed. Thus the cost for him is his life. In addition there is a cost of money- to migrate to Australia he will have to pay between $7-12,000 AUD to become a resident.

    9. Now if this man was a refugee the Australian government would pay roughly $12,000/year once he had been processed and was in the community. It is hard to quantify the economic gain from refugees, however, migrants are responsible for a strong positive contribution to the Australian economy.

      Cost-benefits aside, there is also that thing about saving someones life. You have to ask yourself if you were a persecuted individual would you want the opportunity to leave to a better country and for the people in that country to accept you?

    10. Yes unemployment rates are low but considering the traumatic consequences most refugees have been through, their lack of knowledge, english literacy and other cultural orientations the situation is surely understandable. Additionally Q&A fact check found the legitimacy of that study to be dubious at best;

      When contacted by The Conversation, a spokesman for the Department of Social Services, which manages access to the Building a New Life in Australia data on behalf of AIFS, said it was “not possible to accurately calculate an ‘unemployment rate’ using the study’s data”.

      The Building a New Life in Australia study is not a representative snapshot of all refugees in Australia. As it notes, the majority of people involved in the study were new arrivals: 75% had been living in Australia less than six months and 85% for one year or less.

      The study found very high rates of engagement in English language classes and other types of study – meaning that while many of them may not have a job yet, most were working on language and other skills they would need to get one.

      To get the unemployment rate from the above, you would need to divide the number of unemployed people by the total number of people in the labour force and multiply by 100 to get the percentage. For refugees, marked here as “humanitarian”, that works out to be an unemployment rate of about 33%.

      Another longitudinal study from 2011 found that while during the early years of settlement unemployment was high among refugees compared to other migrants, 43% of working age refugees remain unemployed 18 months after arrival in Australia.

      I would like to ask a personal question – what experiences have you had with Muslim individuals in Australia that has lead to your disliking of the religion?

    11. Yes, they have been through a lot, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t cause damage. And yes, I have known 3 or 4 Muslims personally in my life, but for the most part they have been genuine in nature. This did not change the disturbing reports, or the disturbing things that happened to my girlfriend when we were in europe

    12. Certainly but that damage although significant is certainly eclipsed by other issues in Australia.

      Well I’m glad to hear that you have had largely positive experiences and saddened by your negative experiences. Not to devalue your experience, but how certain are you that those individuals in Europe were in fact Muslim people? I myself have travelled through Europe a number of times and have generally found that I could not distinguish certain groups as well as I would have thought and that precarious people come from all ways of life be that religion and country of origin. In fact I would go as far as saying that the number of dubious people, whilst undoubtedly higher in Europe than Australia is also apparent in some areas of Australia and that those people are often not easily distinguished.

      I’m merely asking you to consider if your experiences truly align with your stance and not to judge the majority based on a minority of personal experiences.

    13. I think if your a middle eastern male migrant to Europe, you are probably Muslim. Not certain, but maybe a 99 % chance. They drove out the Christians and Jews a while ago

    14. So you asked them if they were a migrant? I’m not sure which countries you found that in but you’ll find the most common religion in Europe is Catholicism;

      “Catholics are the largest Christian group in EU, accounting for 48% EU citizens, while Protestants make up 12%, and Eastern Orthodox make up 8%, and other Christians account for 4% of the EU population. Non believer/Agnostic account 16%, Atheist account’s 7%, and Muslim 2%.”

    15. Nonetheless it was an assumption and it is dangerous as you are judging all Muslim people based on an interaction with people that may or may not have been Muslim. Considering you have only met 3-4 Muslim people in real life you are therefore assuming these people were Muslim based on stereotypical ideals and even fear eliciting campaigns of “black and Arab” and “crowding in public areas” (isn’t that what public areas are for?). Additionally, as an Australian travelling in Europe I was only able to recognise English and would have no confidence in distinguishing Arabic from French, Italian, Dutch and the many other languages in Europe – which I will obviously accept if you are bi-lingual.

    16. I am not judging all Muslim people like that. So that is your own interpretation but I have not done such a thing. I just said there’s a problem among Islamic migrants, not all of them, but I’m not going to apologize for saying such a thing.

    17. We seem to be at an impasse with your conflicting points of view; you claim that you do not stereotype all Muslim people on your possible experience in Europe and that the 3-4 people Muslim people you have met were genuinely decent. You have also said that “not for a second am I claiming all or even most refugees have evil intentions”. But yet you believe “the harms wreaked by islamic immigration outweigh the benefits.” or is that “Well Muslims can come here, just from countries outside the OIC.”.

      We have gone over the costs- economically and in terms of saving someones life and preventing the religious persecution that they may be placed under if the possibility to immigrate was removed. This is something which certainly strikes me as odd, as for a “freedom-fighter” I would have thought the right to religious freedom would be higher on your priority list. So please tell me these harms which outweigh the benefits and therefore why these lives are not valuable.

  2. Dear aussieconservative, you tread the fine line of ethnocentrism inferring cultural superiority. In fact this is exactly what you despise most in the few but extreme Islamic radicals who believe their religion/culture is superior and wish to enforce it on others. I would advise you to consider your view points and be aware of the patriotic adrenaline trap, do not be blinded.

    I would like to leave you with a quote from Adolf Hitler, 1939 – “The duties of the Reich SS leader include the neutralisation of ethnically alien elements of the populations that represent a danger to the Reich and German Volk community”

    The ideology is dangerously similar; “It should always be recognized, that European, North American, and Australasian countries, have historically formed a superior culture and way of life.”

    It is important to recognise the cultures are unique and each have a number of weaknesses and strengths, however, none is superior to another.

    1. So a culture that throw gays off buildings, is equal but different to one that respects gays? Cultural relativism is a dying idea, time you jumped on board the reality train

    2. Again you stereotype the majority with the minority. Yes Islamic State has committed horrendous crimes by throwing homosexual men off buildings, however, a blinding majority of people in the Islamic communities have condemned these actions.

      Speaking about jumping on band wagons- since when where you such an advocate for gays; “Marriage is an institution between a man and a woman, and and I don’t believe a term such as ‘gay marriage’ makes a great deal of sense. I disagree with the increased rights gay marriage legislation would give gay couples in adoption.” -Aussieconservative 2015.

    3. Haha my position would be considered extremely progressive in all areas of the Islamic world. How many Islamic countries out of the 58 or so there are, do not criminalise homosexual behaviour, with fines at best, and death at worst? How many? I would say youd struggle to name a handful, if even one. You can’t keep saying ‘it’s the minority’ without substantive support

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